Oath of Office for President, Congress, Justices, Military and American Citizenship

 

Oath of office of the President of the United States (link)



OATH

 “I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the CONSTITUTION  OF THE UNITED STATES SO HELP ME GOD.”

President Donald Trump taking Oath of Office (link)


Senate’s Oath of Office
(link)




OATH

“I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the CONSTITUTION  OF THE UNITED STATES against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter: SO HELP ME GOD.”




House of Representatives, Congress’ Oath of Office (link)



OATH

“I, [member’s name], do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the CONSTITUTION  OF THE UNITED STATES against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter: SO HELP ME GOD.”



United States House of Representatives


Oaths of Office for Supreme Court Justices (link)


The origin of the second oath is found in the Judiciary Act of 1789, which reads “the justices of the Supreme Court, and the district judges, before they proceed to execute the duties of their respective offices” to take a second oath or affirmation.  From 1789 to 1990, the original text used for this oath (1 Stat. 76 § 8) was:

OATH


“I, _________, do solemnly swear or affirm that I will administer justice without respect to persons, and do equal right to the poor and to the rich, and that I will faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent upon me as _________, according to the best of my abilities and understanding, agreeably to the constitution and laws of the United States.  SO HELP ME GOD


In December 1990, the Judicial Improvements Act of 1990 replaced the phrase “according to the best of my abilities and understanding, agreeably to the Constitution” with “under the Constitution.”  The revised Judicial Oath, found at 28 U. S. C. § 453, reads:

OATH

“I, _________, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will administer justice without respect to persons, and do equal right to the poor and to the rich, and that I will faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent upon me as _________ under the Constitution and laws of the United States.  SO HELP ME GOD.”


The Combined Oath

Upon occasion, appointees to the Supreme Court have taken a combined version of the two oaths, which reads:

“I, _________, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will administer justice without respect to persons, and do equal right to the poor and to the rich, and that I will faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent upon me as _________ under the CONSTITUTION  and laws of the United States; and that I will support and defend the CONSTITUTION  OF THE UNITED STATES against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter.  SO HELP ME GOD.

 
 

Oath of Allegiance to join the United States Military



OATH

The wordings of the current oath of enlistment and oath for commissioned officers are as follows:

“I, _____, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.” (Title 10, US Code; Act of 5 May 1960 replacing the wording first adopted in 1789, with amendment effective 5 October 1962).

“I, _____ (SSAN), having been appointed an officer in the Army of the United States, as indicated above in the grade of _____ do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter; So help me God.”

(DA Form 71, 1 August 1959, for officers.)

Soldier taking oath



Oath to become a United States Citizen

Do you know that when people from other countries who want to become an American citizen have to swear a pledge to join American?  Knowing and understanding this pledge helps give us as American citizens or those who desire to become an American citizen a better understanding of what a powerful oath privileged this is, as well of helping to give you perspective of those who came to America, swore this oath, but not live contrary to it.  Check it out here


OATH

“I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law; and that I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God.”


Group being sworn in as new U. S. Citizens taking the above oath

Click on link below to have a word version of this page
Governmental Oath’s of Office for President, Senate, Congress, Supr…

Screen capture from youtube.com/WhiteHouse; youtube.com/The New York Times; supremecourt.gov; Wikipedia.com
 
 
Updated 03.23.19
 
 
, , , ,
THE BILL OF RIGHTS, To the United States Constitution
VOTE! Wallbuilders – See if you are registered to Vote and Register if not

Related Posts

Menu